Russia announced a new anti-aircraft artillery system

Russia’s Ministry of Defence announced on Wednesday a new anti-craft artillery system is being developed in the Ground Forces. The new system, whose name was not mentioned, will replace the old ZSU-23-4 “Shilka” system, in service since 1962.

Russia’s new New anti-aircraft artillery system. Credit: © Russian Ministry of Defence/Creative Commons Attribution 4.0

“This complex is designed to engage air targets such as tactical UAVs, single rocket launchers, cruise missiles, shock elements of WTO systems and tactical aviation aircraft, fire support helicopters, as well as surface and surface lightly armored targets,” said Russian Ministry of Defence.

“In addition, in 2018, equipment was planned with modern weapons and equipment, including: two military formations of air defense – short-range antiaircraft missile system Tor-M2; an air defense unit operating in the Arctic and the Far North conditions with a Tor-M2DT short-range anti-aircraft missile system; air defense units of combined-arms formations – a portable anti-aircraft missile system “Verba”, added the Defense Ministry.

Russia is in the middle of military renewing, and in late 2017 President Vladimir Putin approved Russia’s State Armament Program (SAP) for 2018-2027. The SAP will give “specific attention on precision weaponry, as it is a present-day tendency in the development of all armed conflicts”, said Russian Deputy Defense Minister Yuri Borisov on 23 November 2017. “Top priority, naturally, will be given to the development of nuclear deterrence systems as a key type of armed forces which guarantees security of our country in conflicts of any kind,” he added.

Russia used Syria’s ground to test some of its most advanced new weapons, including SU-34 fighter jet and cruise missiles.

 

Syria: where ISIS’ weapons come from? A quarter were made in Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary

General-purpose machine guns

A new report by Conflict Armament Research (CAR) claims nearly a quarter of arms recovered from Islamic State (also known as ISIS or ISIL) in Iraq and Syria were made in Romania, Bulgaria and Hungary.

The Islamist militants took the weapons from Syrian rebels and other groups who oppose them, whom bought the weapons from United States and Saudi Arabia (both The United States and Saudi Arabia supplied most of this materiel without authorisation, the report claims).

“CAR has traced numerous items deployed by IS forces to initial exports from Bulgaria to Saudi Arabia. These transfers were uniformly subject to non-retransfer clauses concluded between Saudi Arabia and the Government of Bulgaria prior to export. In this respect onward re-transfers by Saudi Arabia of these weapons contravene its commitments to the Government of Bulgaria not to re-export the material in question without Bulgaria’s prior consent”, it wrote on the report.

The 222 pages report shows 33 percent of ISIS’ weapons come from the EU-bloc, following Russia and China, which combined together provided over 50 percent of ISIS’ weapons.

The United States manufactured only 2 per cent of weapons used from IS forces and documented by CAR in the region.

Furthermore, China, Russia and Eastern European states provided around 90 percent of ammunition used by ISIS militants during their fight.